In the previous blog we reflected on the virtues of emotional intelligence and noted that an emotionally intelligent person has the ability to tune into the emotional wavelengths of other humans.  In this section, we explore how EI can have a practical affect on our relationships in the workplace and also how we can use it to succeed at interview.

 

We have all experienced how a piece of bad news can spoil an entire day.  For example, a particularly irate customer venting anger towards me or a hostile team member can understandably put me in a testy mood.  It seems to be written into our programming that sometimes a solitary piece of bad news can undermine a whole host of otherwise positive experiences.  An EI person can accept this situation for what it is and put the negativity into its proper and usually insignificant context.  A high level of EI within a team ensures a more harmonious and less fractious set of relationships.  EI gives us the capacity to recognise expressions of emotion for what they are: constructs honed through evolution that are no more than expressions of primitive thought processes.  To quote Kipling:

 

    If you can keep your head when all about you   

    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you…

 

EI also plays a significant role in the job hunting process.  Many academically intelligent people have presented themselves at interview but have failed because of a lack of empathy.  A person ablaze with EI recognises the anxieties of the interviewer and can tailor their responses accordingly.  An interview is an artificial construct, but the a successful interview is one in which human beings have engaged in a meaningful relationship.  EI will lead to positivity, an outgoing nature, cheerfulness and enthusiasm; the core ingredients of a great interview.

 

Namaste

radiohead